Review of Disabled Persons Act Applicability to Websites Withdrawn; California Agency Issues Guidance on CASp Benefits; and Novel New Serial Lawsuits Filed Against Car Dealerships

By Kristina Launey

As we’ve discussed previously, California is a hotbed for disability access suits – both based upon alleged physical accessibility violations of California law and the ADA and

By Kristina M. Launey and Minh N. Vu

Plaintiffs suing businesses in California for alleged disability access violations usually assert claims under a number of statutes, including the Disabled Persons Act (DPA) (Cal. Civil Code § 54 et seq.) and the Unruh Civil Rights Act (Cal. Civil Code § 51 et seq.), as well as

By Kristina M. Launey 

UPDATE:  The bill passed both houses of the Legislature and was sent to the Governor’s desk on September 1, 2012.

California businesses have for years prayed for relief from drive-by disability access lawsuits.  SB 1608 of 2008 was widely-hoped to be that savior, but has proven to have relatively little

By Todd C. Hunt 

On the heels of Cullen v. Netflix, Inc., reported here last month, two other federal judges in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California followed the lead established by the Ninth Circuit more than a decade ago in ruling in a putative class action that websites not connected

By Minh N. Vu

On June 22, we reported on the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts’ ruling that Netflix’s video streaming website is a “place of public accommodation” covered under Title III of the ADA, even though the website has no nexus to a physical place.  This ruling was not surprising given

By Kristina M. Launey

So held U.S. District Court Judge Morrison England, in the Eastern District of California, last week in a suit filed by Robert Segalman, who is blind and requires use of a wheelchair. Segalman alleged that Southwest Airlines’ improper stowage and transport of his power wheelchair caused him injury, in violation of

By Jon Meer & Myra Villamor

It is a common practice among a growing group of serial plaintiffs to slap businesses with frivolous “accessibility discrimination” lawsuits under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and similar state laws such as the California Disabled Persons and Unruh Acts.  In these cases, a person with a disability claims