As we’ve previously reported, new Department of Justice rules give individuals with mobility disabilities the right under the ADA to use a wide variety of non-traditional powered mobility devices in public accommodations facilities.  The lawsuits and complaints about this issue are on the rise so businesses should familiarize themselves with this issue to avoid

By Michael Fleischer

They’re here and they’re not going away. Six weeks ago we blogged about AXS Map. Now comes AbleRoad, a much more comprehensive customer review website/mobile app that allows individuals to post online reviews of a business’s accessibility to individuals with disabilities.

AbleRoad, which worked with Yelp.com to allow both Yelp

By Minh N. Vu

Similar to Trip Advisor and Yelp, AXS Map is a  new customer review website/mobile app that allows people to review businesses on their accessibility to people with disabilities.  Every business that opens its doors to the public can be reviewed.  Hotels, restaurants, retailers, gyms: You name it – it’s on AXS

By: Kristina Launey

As we reported last year, in September 2012, the Governor signed into law legislation reforming some of California’s disability access statutes.  Most of those reforms went into effect as of the date the Governor signed the bill, but one provision becomes effective today, July 1, 2013. 

California Civil Code Section 1938

By John W. Egan

One common misconception about the design and construction requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is that historical landmarks are exempt.  Another is that the ADA does not apply when an element is merely replaced.  A recent decision by a New Hampshire federal court dispels both of these notions.

At

By Minh N. Vu

Owners of commercial facilities and developers of multifamily housing should take note of an alarming trend:  Some courts are not allowing owners and developers to sue their architects and consultants for designing facilities that do not comply Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Fair Housing Act (FHA) accessibility requirements.

The most

By Minh N. Vu

A recent case decided by a federal court in Maryland illustrates the challenge that businesses sometimes face in having to make on-the-spot decisions about whether it is safe to allow a person with a disability to engage in an activity.  The activity at issue was paintball.  A paintball park operator refused

By Kristina M. Launey

Contrary to popular belief, Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act does not apply exclusively to public accommodations (businesses that provide goods and services to the general public).  Commercial facilities (privately-owned, non-residential facilities whose operations affect commerce but that do not serve customers or clients, such as factories, warehouses, or