By Kristina Launey

Businesses in California have for years struggled to comply with both California’s Title 24 accessibility standards for buildings and the federal standards under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) because those standards differed in many respects.  The differences became even more pronounced after the Department of Justice adopted the 2010 ADA Standards

By Minh N. Vu

The Department of Justice’s (DOJ) deadline for hotels, health clubs, and other public accommodations to retrofit their existing pools and spas with either a pool lift or sloped entry ramp is January 31, 2013.  Under regulations the DOJ issued in 2010, all pools with less than 300 linear feet of wall

By Kristina M. Launey

As noted during our Healthcare webinar last week, the accessibility of drug labels accessible is on the Administration’s agenda.  Yesterday the Access Board announced that the stakeholder working group it organized to develop best practices for making drug labels accessible will hold its first public meeting January 10 and 11 in

By Andrew M. McNaught

Businesses, particularly retail establishments, are increasingly confronting customers’ use, or desired use, of Segways and similar Personal Mobility Devices (“PMD”).  Some patrons with disabilities prefer to use Segways instead of wheelchairs or motorized scooters, but Segways can operate at faster speeds and often cause legitimate safety concerns for businesses operating places

By Eden Anderson

On June 7, 2012, the United States Access Board (“Access Board”) hosted a webinar to discuss new accessibility requirements for miniature golf courses.  We listened in and summarize program highlights here. 

On September 15, 2010, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) issued new regulations adopting the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design (“2010

By Kristina M. Launey

Contrary to popular belief, Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act does not apply exclusively to public accommodations (businesses that provide goods and services to the general public).  Commercial facilities (privately-owned, non-residential facilities whose operations affect commerce but that do not serve customers or clients, such as factories, warehouses, or